Jack-o'-lanterns-displayed in a park

Creating a Healthy Halloween

The Best in Family Health by Karen Ranzi - Fruit-Powered Digest

As October approaches, we are aware that at the end of the month comes the Holiday of Candy. That’s what came to concern me each year in the autumn. A holiday focused on the insane eating of candy by the bags.

When I was a child, I would go trick-or-treating with the intent of bringing home at least four large bags of sweet goodies to last me for months. All the resulting cavities and facial acne were caused by these toxic refined sugars.

When I would ask the dermatologist if my acne has anything to do with the food I’m eating, the response was always: “You can eat as much candy and cookies as you want. Skin problems are genetic and not at all connected with what you’re eating.” I learned decades later the incorrectness of this response.

Trick-or-treaters stand in line

Sugar contributes to all the diseases we see in our civilized society today, including cancer, heart disease, digestive issues, acne and many other skin conditions, autoimmune disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, bipolar and depression, asthma and numerous other chronic illnesses. Yet, parents parade the neighborhood with their children in costumes carrying bags to collect candy, which will pay into the promotion and profit of many candy companies, a billion-dollar industry.

In my forthcoming book Raw Vegan Recipe Fun for Families, I point out: “A recent study shows that the risk of stroke increases by 83% when drinking even one soda a day, especially for women. The combo of refined fructose and carbolic acid is lethal. Diet sodas are even worse. Some adolescents are getting 40% of their calories from refined sugars. They can’t handle it, and the results are disastrous. Eighty percent of foods sold in America have added refined sugars.”

Through years of Halloween trick-or-treating with my kids, I have some tips to help make your Halloween healthier and more enjoyable.

Halloween Health Tips

1. Provide a good healthy meal for your kids before going out trick-or-treating. If they’re satisfied with fruits and vegetables, they’ll be less likely to want the candy.

2. Hand out healthy snacks like raisin boxes. At the dollar store and party store, buy skeleton rings, witch nails, colorful pencils, fake necklaces, miniature sports balls and fun masks to give to the children trick-or-treating at your house. You can also find great recycled gifts to give. My husband is the town chairman of the recycling committee, and one year he brought home recycled Frisbees, which were the perfect Halloween gift. All the neighborhood children loved them.

3. Exchange the candy your children collect for special toys they’ve wanted, a book on a fascinating topic, healthier whole raw food candy you either make or purchase or a paper you sign to provide a special gift at a favorite store. Every year, we threw the Halloween candy in the garbage. When my kids became adolescents, they would seem happy with the exchange we made, but they regretted not eating the candy when with their peers. It was a perceived need to fit in. As young adults today who were raised on plant foods, they are grateful not to have been drugged up with refined candy throughout their growing years.

Watch to See Special Treats Karen Ranzi Gives out on Halloween

Recipe for Halloween Ghosts from Karen Ranzi

Check out Karen’s Halloween Ghosts recipe!


Silhouettes of children trick-or-treating in Halloween costumes

Check out Karen’s article “Enjoying Halloween Without Candy”!


Creating Healthy Children author Karen Ranzi

Check out Karen’s transformation profile!


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